December 15, 2020

All the Ways to Clean Silver: Ranked from Worst to Best

If you’re lucky enough to have inherited a set of silver flatware or invested in some ornate candlesticks, you know that its shine can begin to dull and tarnish in as little as a few months. This is actually because household silver (used for jewelry, platters, tea sets, etc.) is a composite of pure silver, which is very soft, and other, stronger metals like copper to create a long-lasting final product. Tarnish on sterling silver can appear in the form of a yellow-gray or almost black film on the surface of an item, but unlike rust which eats away at metal, tarnish is easily dealt with. Sterling silver, like many other metals, just requires a bit of upkeep to maintain a mirror-like shine.  Lucky us, when we put out the call, you answered. Based on suggestions from our community, we tried six different methods—some store-bought, some DIY—all on one lucky spoon. Read through our findings below to find out which methods didn’t exactly stack up, and which was the clear winner. Least Effective: Toothpaste Two readers, QueenSashy and Klrcon, suggested using toothpaste to clean silver—but Boulangere said that it's "abrasive and will scratch the silver, especially if it's not silver plate." Well, it didn’t do all that much.  Definitely the least abrasive cleaner out of this lot, a whitening toothpaste only lightened the tarnish rather than removing it altogether—which, depending on your needs, might be enough. Smell is great and it's not a very annoying thing to get on your fingers because it just rinses off. Cost is minimal (and/or you probably already have it on hand). Most Aggressive: Hubcap Cleaner The man who sold me a set of silver-plate utensils (not mad at him, because technically I didn't ask) recommended hubcap cleaner as the best way to get them squeaky clean.  Far and away the most aggressive of the cleaners we tested, hubcap cleaner left the most silvery, shiny section—but stripped away all the good tarnish and even left a strange splotch. Dug up on a back shelf at Home Depot, this wasn't the easiest bottle to source in New York.  Something about rubbing hubcap cleaner on a utensil you wish to eat off of later just feels...wrong.  Great in a Pinch: Lemon Juice & Baking Soda  "Oxidation on silver can be cleaned off with lemon juice and baking soda," Rebecca Harvey shared. Easy enough to just reach in the fridge and pantry for these supplies, we set to work.  Relatively abrasive, especially for an all-natural cleaner, this combination removed almost all of the tarnish (even some of the good kind) and left a slightly dulled sheen.  Made by mixing up two common pantry items, this one is something you'll always have on hand—and very easy to come by if you don't. The fizzing effect was great fun.    User Claire Smith recommended jewelry cleaner, and others got specific: "I think Wright's silver polish is the best," said Molly Fuller (who was seconded by Boulangere). Chocolate Be raised the bar with her recommendation: "Each and every time you polish silver with anything but Tiffany silver polish (which is very expensive and I don't know if it is still even available) you will be taking some silver off your piece."  Both highly effective and gentle, this silver cleaner removed the brown tinge of tarnish without getting rid of any of the good stuff.  Obtaining it was easy in New York City, where you can just swing by the Tiffany's store even if you're wearing sneakers, but wouldn't be as simple to come by in other markets. Spray feature made it easy to coat a piece quickly, and would have been really nice if you were cleaning a lot at once.  At $20 a bottle, it was the cheapest item in the Tiffany's store, but pricey comparatively. Wright's Silver Cream. With a strength comparable to the Tiffany's cleaner, Wright's was very effective right from the bottle—though it did require a little more time to get a high shine.  Sponge applicator doesn't make total sense when you're cleaning forks rather than earrings, but did the great work of keeping it mostly off your hands.  One of the lower-priced off-the-shelf cleaners, Wright's is easy to obtain at any drug store or pharmacy and consistently low in cost. Best Overall: Aluminum Foil, Baking Soda & Hot Water Klrcon insisted that "for silverware the easiest method is the aluminum foil and baking soda trick," which is something we heard from a number of users. "You just dump it in the sink and let it soak and it does a darn good job of getting even heavily oxidized tarnish off if you leave it long enough... Then you just give it a good rinse."  Shop the Story Others suggested variations on this solution, ranging from Pegeen's tip "to fill an aluminum pan (or one lined with aluminum foil) with hot water, add salt and baking soda, and stir to dissolve. When you add the silver pieces, a chemical reaction occurs, removing tarnish." to our creative director Alexis' version, which called for just baking soda, stirred into hot water in a pan lined with aluminum foil. A short soak in this solution loosened the dark tarnish so that it rubbed right off, but left just the right amount of lighter coloring that we love. Being mostly water based, it was the least gunky solution to deal with. As the baking soda and foil reacted with the silver, the whole bath gave off a slightly strange, dirty scent. Though it required a bit of set-up—lining a dish with foil, then dumping in baking soda and hot water—we could see how this would be the easiest way to polish a mess of silverware by far. The Verdict? While true silver polishes, such as both Tiffany's and Wright's, cleaned the spoon very much to our liking (meaning thoroughly but without excessive abrasion), nothing compared in ease, effectiveness, and lack of mess than the combination of baking soda, hot water, and aluminum foil. It's all-natural, effective because of a chemical reaction (which we geekily love), and seemed impossible to mess up. We also loved how simple it would be for cleaning a whole pile of silver.  If you happen to live near a Tiffany's and don't mind forking over for a bottle, or have a tub of Wright's on hand for cleaning earrings, they wouldn't be bad in a pinch. Our tube of toothpaste didn't seem very effective, but the real concern would be that every tube is different so the potency would be hard to moniter. Both lemon juice + baking soda and hubcap cleaner were so powerful we'd be scared to try them on good silver—and the latter was just a little gross to consider for untensils. Here's How to Do It: Line a casserole dish or shallow vessel with aluminum foil (or obtain an aluminum dish). Sprinkle in a generous amount of baking soda. Add the silver pieces, being sure that each piece touches the foil.  Pour hot water on top, wait until it cools, and then remove each piece and rub clean with a rag.  First photo by Bobbi Lin; all others by Alpha Smoot. This article has been updated in December 2020 to provide even more (!) silver-cleaning tips. 
December 15, 2020

A Guide to Gluten-Free Pasta (and Which One We Picked as Our Favorite)

Gluten-free pasta started out humbly enough: I saw that white rice was ground to a flour and shaped into slightly mushy versions of penne rigate. Then I saw a box of quinoa pasta, and then chickpea pasta made an appearance. Now, every time I walk through the grocery store it feels like there's another gluten-free pasta available. While all of these pastas can be rounded up and categorized into "gluten-free pastas," I learned after a very starchy taste test of 7 popular gluten-free pastas (chickpea pasta, red lentil pasta, black bean pasta, quinoa pasta, corn pasta, white rice pasta, and brown rice pasta) that each variation tastes incredibly different—and takes to different sauces in different ways. Here's what to use these gluten-free pastas for, and what we liked—and didn't—about each variation: From Our Shop our line! Five Two Essential Saucepan $69–$89 More Sizes our line! Five Two Silicone Spoons $49 More Colors our line! Five Two Stoneware Bowl (Set of 4) $59–$69 More Options Our Gluten-Free Pasta Test Taste Chickpea Photo by James Ransom Chickpea Pasta (Banza): This pasta started out promisingly. As soon as I put the chickpea pasta into the pan, it sunk to the bottom and formed a line across the center of the pot. When I fished a few chickpea soldiers out at five minutes, they were still chewy, but another couple of minutes did the trick. Verdict: If undercooked, pasta retains its shape very well and doesn’t stick together once plated and dried—if cooked even a moment too long, it turns to mush in the pot or the colander. Unfortunately, it leaves a distinct chickpea aftertaste, and once chewed, it’s difficult to differentiate the pasta from a mouthful of chickpeas... but, more chewy. It’s not such a strong flavor that it would overpower a flavorful pasta sauce, but it will be hard to ignore if you’re making a simple aglio e olio. Recommended cook time: 7 minutes, 30 seconds Try it With: Nigel Slater's Really Good Spaghetti Bolognese Nigel Slater's Really Good Spaghetti Bolognese. A hearty meat sauce is robust enough that you probably won’t even be able to taste chickpeas pasta’s nutty flavor. Don’t forget to top it with plenty of good Parmesan cheese. Chickpea Fettuccine with Harissa, Kale, and Olives Chickpea Fettuccine with Harissa, Kale, and Olives. This recipe was actually developed with chickpea pasta in mind, so it’s best to lean in. Spicy harissa and briny olives pair surprisingly well with the pasta (not so odd though, as they pair great with regular chickpeas!) Lentil Red Lentil Pasta (Tolerant Foods): Made with just red lentil flour (no other stabilizers, unlike a number of the other gluten-free pastas on the market,) this one is high-fiber and protein (11 and 25 grams per 3.5-ounce serving respectively) Verdict: This one tasted mostly neutral, and while it didn't taste like a pasta made with grains, it was enjoyable in terms of texture. Recommended cook time: 7-9 minutes Try it With: Pasta with Gorgonzola, Radicchio, Walnuts, and Orange. With bitter radicchio, sweet orange, and funky-cream cheese, once again, your pasta accompaniments will distract from the fact that this pasta is made with lentils, not wheat. Pasta with Gorgonzola, Radicchio, Walnuts, and Orange Black Bean Black Bean Pasta (Explore Cuisine): Though I assumed they'd be made with the same black beans I use in burritos, it appears that most pastas labeled "black bean" are in fact made from black soybeans, like this one (which also has black sesame flour, presumably for color and additional nutty flavor.) It becomes abundantly clear when tasting gluten-free pastas, particularly those made from legumes and not grains, that you shouldn't enter into the experience thinking they will taste like wheat pasta. Legume pastas, like black bean, red lentil, and chickpea), are their own experience, and should be treated as such. Verdict: A bit nutty and dense, this pasta definitely tastes like it's rich in protein (23 grams in 2 ounces!). The flavor didn't wow me, but I'd eat it again if I found myself with a box. Recommended cook time: 6-8 minutes. Try it With: Spaghetti With Charred Scallion Sauce Spaghetti With Charred Scallion Sauce This pasta didn't go great with red sauce, but would do fairly well here, in an "extremely untraditional riff on the Italian aglio e olio," where scallions replace garlic—I'd add a big spoonful of chili crisp as well. Quinoa Photo by James Ransom All-Quinoa Pasta (Pereg): Many quinoa pastas, like the one listed above, contain corn as the first ingredient, but this brand lists whole-grain quinoa flour at the top of its list (followed by potato starch, egg white, and vegetable oil). Once in the water, it cooked extremely quickly (roughly 5 and a half minutes to 6 minutes, at most). Verdict: While I’m impressed with the extremely quick cook time and liked the flavor—it tastes exactly like quinoa and has that same grainy earthiness, which was fine except that I couldn’t get past the texture. It disintegrates almost as soon as you start chewing. I don’t think I would make these again because if I ever craved them, I would just make quinoa. Recommended cook time: 6 minutes, at most Try it With: Marcella Hazan's Tomato Sauce With Onion & Butter Marcella Hazan's Tomato Sauce With Onion & Butter. With a mild-tasting quinoa pasta, it’s best to stick with a classic, like Marcella Hazan's tomato, onion, and butter sauce, which is rich and deeply flavorful. Quinoa with Corn Flour (Ancient Harvest): The instructions on the back called for a 6 to 9 minute cook time and warned me, “DO NOT OVERCOOK” so I set my alarm for 5 minutes... and then 9 minutes... and then 10, at which point they were still almost inedible. (Almost immediately, the water became so murky that I couldn’t see the pasta.) By 12 minutes, they were done and extremely mushy. Once I took them out, I saw that they had left a film on the entire pan that I had to scrub to get off. Verdict: These are extremely delicate and taste much more like corn than they do quinoa—almost like a corn tortilla that’s been dipped in water, which is kind of fun to eat in pasta form, but I'd definitely prefer it in chip form. On the plus side, they held their shape when chewed. Recommended cook time: 11 to 12 minutes Try it With: Cavatappi with Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Brie & Arugula Cavatappi with Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Brie & Arugula. Leaning into strong flavors is the best way to complement quinoa pasta. Toss the pasta in oily, tangy-sweet sun-dried tomatoes, squidgy brie, peppery arugula. For a bit of extra smoke, add some chopped bacon if you have any on hand. All-cap warnings marked nearly all of the bags of pasta (NOT MUSHY and DO NOT OVERCOOK) Corn Pasta Corn and Rice Flour (Barilla): The instructions recommend to salt the pasta water well to help with flavor, but that otherwise this pasta should be a seamless replacement for wheat. I had high hopes, and wasn't disappointed. Verdict: This pasta is very mild in flavor, which, considering some of the others, actually turned out to be a good thing. It has a fairly sturdy texture as well, making it ideal for standing up to thick sauces. Recommended cook time: 7 minutes. Try it With: Caroline Choe's Kimchi Mac & Cheese Caroline Choe's Kimchi Mac & Cheese. Spicy, creamy kimchi mac & cheese brings richness and bold flavor, which helps bring this mild corn pasta to life. Rice Photo by Bobbi Lin Brown Rice (Tinkyáda): At 12 minutes, this pasta took slightly more time to cook than the other gluten-free pastas, and as soon as I took it out, it was extremely slimy—so much so that I couldn't grab one noodle—but that luckily wore off as it dried! Verdict: This pasta looks the most like regular, gluten-graced pasta, but the difference becomes immediately evident as you eat it—it doesn’t taste like anything, and it squeaked as I chewed, which was off-putting. Recommended cook time: 12 minutes Try it with: Our Best Basil Pesto Our Best Basil Pesto. Slick brown rice pasta in a classic, creamy basil and parmesan cheese-based pesto with plenty of olive oil. For a little extra protein, add sliced sausage or a can of white beans. Kale Pesto Orecchiette Kale Pesto Orecchiette. For a more nutrient-dense (and absolutely stunning green), nut-free pesto to go with your nutty brown rice pasta, try this kale version, extra-tangy thanks to a hit of Dijon mustard. White Rice (Melotti): As soon as I put the pasta into the pot, it started to boil over, so the cooking process required a bit of vigilance. Verdict: It tastes like a mushed-together ball of sticky rice, which was not extremely appealing—if given the option, I would prefer to just eat white rice. Or even an actual ball of mushed-together sticky rice. It also had a slightly slimy feel to it. *Recommended cook time: 11 to 12 minutes Try it with: Best Fettuccine Alfredo Best Alfredo Fettuccini.For a classic creamy pasta (perhaps to remind you that even though you’re eating white rice pasta, you don’t have to skip the cream and cheese—preferably a 50/50 blend of Parmesan and Pecorino Romano.) Vegan Cauliflower Alfredo Bake Vegan Cauliflower Alfredo Bake. For any of those vegan and gluten-free folks out there (we see you! we hear you!), look no further than this cauliflower alfredo bake, which you could definitely make with brown rice pasta, but also any of the above gluten-free pastas Photo by Alpha Smoot Cut to the Chase: Best shape-retention: Brown Rice Best flavor: Red Lentil and Corn-Quinoa Best look: Corn-Brown Rice Best overall: It depends on what you’re cooking and what your flavor preferences are! But we would pick a tie between the red lentil and corn-brown rice. What are some of your favorite gluten-free pasta options and pairings? Tell us in the comments below!
December 15, 2020

A Parmigiana Without Tomatoes? It’s Not Just Possible, It’s Fantastic

We've partnered with the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium to share delicious ways to use this savory powerhouse in your cooking—and prove that it’s so much more than just a topping. Known for its unmistakable taste and perfectly crumbly texture, this cheese is made with only three ingredients, but the real magic comes after it's been aged for more than a year (in Italy, according to old-school methods). Parmigiana is a true Italian classic, with quite possibly as many variations as there are cooks. While the most well-known version, parmigiana di melanzane, involves slices of eggplant (grilled or deep-fried, depending on which camp you're in) baked with tomato sauce and melting cheese, it’s a dish that lends itself well to adaptations—and has for centuries. Take my fennel parmigiana: a comforting, wintry version where egg, milk, and cheese combine to make a custardy filling that replaces the tomato sauce. On top, there’s a crisp, golden crust of Parmigiano Reggiano and breadcrumbs so good that you'll want to bake it in your widest casserole dish, to maximize the crunchy surface area. From Our Shop Sale! Staub Matte Ceramic Rectangular Baking Dish $34–$84 $34–$69 More Options Microplane Elite Box Grater $40 Many people think parmigiana is a dish that originated in Parma in northern Italy (when it’s actually from the south), so it has become almost a requirement for this dish to involve Parmigiano Reggiano, the region's best-loved cheese. In fact, what really makes a parmigiana a parmigiana is the dish's layers—it takes its name from Sicilian window shutters, with the layers referencing the look of the overlapping wooden slats. But using Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is an excellent and delicious idea here. (And if you want to be certain yours is the real deal, make sure to check for Parmigiano Reggiano on the label—that certification process is taken very seriously in Europe.) Parmigiano Reggiano is ideal in baked dishes and it adds deep flavor to otherwise sweet, mild-tasting vegetables. It’s a must in both the filling and the crisp top in any parmigiana. Fennel parmigiana can be as simple as layers of boiled and sliced fennel, baked simply with breadcrumbs and Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, made golden with olive oil. Or it can be made even richer with the addition of bechamel, making it not unlike a gratin. Personally, I absolutely can’t resist a parmigiana bianca (a “white,” aka tomato-less, version) made by pouring eggs beaten with a little milk and Parmigiano Reggiano cheese over the vegetables; that sauce then turns into creamy, custardy curds between the layers. My fennel parmigiana makes a wonderful vegetarian main but can also be served as a side dish for the holidays. Either way, it’s a snap to make ahead (in really any part of the recipe), meaning your holiday meal-planning will be that much simpler. Parmigiana di Finocchio (Fennel Parmigiana) View Recipe Ingredients 2 large fennel bulbs (about 1 pound) 1/4 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk (125 milliliters) 4 ounces grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (about 120 grams), divided Freshly ground black pepper 4 tablespoons breadcrumbs 2 balls fresh mozzarella (about 250 grams or 9 ounces) 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus some for greasing 2 large fennel bulbs (about 1 pound) 1/4 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk (125 milliliters) 4 ounces grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (about 120 grams), divided Freshly ground black pepper 4 tablespoons breadcrumbs 2 balls fresh mozzarella (about 250 grams or 9 ounces) 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus some for greasing What’s your favorite Italian dish? Tell us in the comments! In partnership with the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium, we’re sharing delicious ways to use this fridge staple in all types of cooking—not just as a topping for pasta. It's incredibly versatile in the kitchen, infusing broths and sauces with extra umami and making cheese boards even tastier. With Parmigiano Reggiano in your corner, ho-hum flavor is a thing of the past.
December 15, 2020

23 Mediterranean Diet Recipes For A Plate That Pops

Many of our food and travel fantasies center around crystal seas, sunny days, and simple meals enjoyed while languishing on the coasts of Greece and Italy, those Mediterranean Shangri-Las whose residents seem to have mastered the art of living. And now, we have science to back us up.  Researchers have now proven that the Mediterranean diet—full of fish, olive oil, beans, nuts, and fresh produce—is ideal for our hearts and taste buds alike. In celebration, we've compiled a list of simple, flavorful recipes that feature healthy fats, fish, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. And in honor of Italy's passion for dessert, there's even olive oil gelato. Ciao, bella. Sometimes you don't know a classic recipe like poached salmon is missing a crunchy element until you try showering it with crisp seasoned breadcrumbs. The tang of homemade rye and baguette breadcrumbs offsets the richness of the salmon, and a generous coating of chopped fresh herbs—a wonderful Mediterranean touch—adds extra color and flavor.  Shop the Story A warm bath of olive oil awaits the freshest fish or shellfish you can get your fins on. The result is succulent, flavor-packed, hard to overcook (an all-too-common folly in the fish-cooking world) and thoroughly Mediterranean. Add your favorite aromatics to the poaching oil, and watch your catch of the day transform from ordinary to other-worldly.  Beets and oranges are a natural match: tangy, juicy segments highlight beets' delicious earthiness and the combination bounces off the plate with color and flavor. The trick here is to toss them together in the salad just before serving to keep the beets from turning everything pink (for a minute or two, anyway).  Buy the best-quality lentils you can find for this deceptively simple recipe that's a mainstay of French homes and bistros. Don't give into the temptation to gussy it up, because there's a reason this tried-and-true technique doesn't need much attention. Come lunch or dinnertime, however, these lentils will get plenty of attention.  This stellar adaptation of NYC chef Michael Psilakis' Greek salad subs in crunchy shaved fennel for cucumbers and roasted peppers in addition to the salty-briny mainstays of kalamata and green olives, feta cheese, and crisp romaine lettuce. A homemade lemony dressing ties it all together for the acid-forward salad side your entree deserves.   This delicious brothy soup, packed with hearty vegetables and legumes and slow-simmered with the umami powerhouse of parmesan rinds, will carry you through the coldest, wettest winters, but is light enough to serve in any season. Use this blueprint to find a worthy home for any vegetables that need one, and don't forget the little snowstorm (or blizzard) of grated cheese on top. The salty-savory duo of sardines *and* anchovies is oceanic nirvana in this pasta con sarde recipe. You read that right, two delightfully fishy fish in one powerfully flavorful dish. White wine, garlic, and chili flakes bring the sauce together for a balanced bite, and fennel seeds and currants add sweet notes that will keep you coming back to this beloved Mediterranean pasta.  The pairing of sweet potato and pomegranate is one for the ages. Something special happens when tart, juicy red fruit flavor hits the earthy, sweet-savoriness of roasted sweet potato. Toss with farro for heft and bite, and kale for color (and because everyone loves kale) and serve for a light lunch or satisfying dinner side dish.  Earthy mushrooms and sweet, herbal fennel pollen team up for a welcome update to the marinated mushrooms you get at the olive bar (or in a jar). Use the mushrooms you have on-hand and toss with capers, fresh herbs, and green onion to highlight that delicious forest floor flavor. Whatever you were thinking of serving it on is exactly what you should serve it on, in, with, around — eggs, crostini, sandwiches, pasta, the sky's the limit. So many kinds of Mediterranean recipes benefit from the bright, salty punch of preserved lemons. Buy them at a Middle Eastern grocer or specialty market, or source them online, but truth be told, this age-old technique is too easy and fun to pass up. Find the juiciest, thinnest-skinned lemons you can, and prepare to exert very little effort for huge flavor gains.  The sweet-salty green olive flavor in this creamy gelato is smooth, seductive, and thoroughly satisfying. Forget everything you know about making gelato—this recipe requires its own roadmap owing to a generous dose of your best extra—and embark on a journey to silky frozen heaven.   This vibrant side is an easy, delicious way to use up that jar of grape leaves without having to stuff each individual one. Instead, all the elements of homemade stuffed grape leaves come together in one bowl. Deconstructed, un-stuffed, bowl-style, however you describe it, your fellow diners will enjoy the flavors of this beloved Mediterranean appetizers (crisped up nicely by sugar snap peas) without the extra effort on your part.  Whole fish are more economical than their portioned-out counterparts—all apologies to fillets and steaks—and when left intact, retain more moisture and flavor during cooking. Preparing whole fish doesn't take any more time than fillets or steaks and yields significantly more meat. Serve this simple fish with an equally simple side of garlic rosemary potatoes  You only need three ingredients to recreate this elegant dish at home: olive oil, good-quality eggs, and a handful of chopped fresh herbs (anything you have on hand works great). This pared-down technique relies on the nature of each of its elements: both eggs and herbs *want* to be fried in olive oil. We're just helping things fall into place...and making toast.  Bitter and sweet flavors are hallmarks of Mediterranean cuisine. The balance of dark greens (or in this case, pinks and purples) with the natural sugars in roasted carrots is sublime, perked up with the sweet, fruity acidity of fig balsamic vinaigrette. Fresh or dried figs both work beautifully in this application, but don't miss the complexity they bring to this eye-catching dish.  As quick and easy to make as it is to shop for, this shrimp recipe will become a mainstay of weeknight cooking and special occasion dishes alike. Use plenty of all the ingredients called for, because when it comes to flavoring shellfish with lemon, garlic, and parsley, more is definitely merrier. Just remember: the more sauce you make, the more crusty bread you'll need for sopping it all up.   Mint grows abundantly throughout the Mediterranean, and is used in sweet and savory dishes of all kinds. Its lightly sweet freshness perks up earthy eggplant in this warm salad recipe that needs little more than a drizzle of olive oil and squeeze of lemon juice to let each ingredient strut its stuff.  If you have 10 minutes and a craving for a creamy soup that calls for no dairy whatsoever, this velvety soup will be the star of the evening (although it's delicious a little chunky, too). Flash-seared squid doesn't have time to toughen up, leaving it as a tender topping for this buttery-textured soup.  Do with wheat berries what you would do with pasta, and the result will be rib-sticking, toothsome, and only too glad to take on the flavors of anything it's cooked with. Savory-salty pistachio pesto clings to this delicious whole grain in a way that convinces the diner these two were meant to be together.  What could be more Mediterranean than vegetables stuffed with other vegetables? Nothing, is what. Two summer produce staples come together in this recipe for a colorful, savory dish studded with nuts and sprinkled with fresh herbs. They're delicious hot out of the oven, at room temperature, or chilled for a picnic. Adjust the spice level to taste, but be forewarned: these are fire regardless.  One of the most delicious things you can do to a piece of fish is to cook it for just enough time in a flavorful liquid and pair it with vegetables. Follow Martha Rose Shulman's time-tested technique for foolproof perfectly quick-braised halibut and savor the resulting delicate fish broth.  Vegetables and olive oil are a natural match, and vegetables that crisp up as perfectly as tender baby artichokes practically require a quick-fry in liquid gold. No batter or coating needed, just a quick double-fry at two temperatures to ensure the result is as tender inside as it is crunchy outside. Top with a squeeze of lemon and enjoy this seasonal vegetable in all its magnificent simplicity.    This vibrant party dip calls on the flavors of Polish cwikła, usually served at Easter. Zingy fresh horseradish (or jarred if you can't find fresh) adds freshness and heat to creamy Greek yogurt. Serve it with an assortment of raw vegetables, but just know that guests will dip anything into it they can find.  Looking to make your diet a little more Mediterranean? Start with these 10 fish recipes.
December 15, 2020

Star Bread

Star Bread is a visually stunning, decadent tasting sweet bread, that will be the talk of the table. Whether it’s for the holidays or a special […]
December 14, 2020

Sage, Rosemary, & Thyme G&T

Garnish with thyme, rosemary, and sage. Add your charred lemon slice to the rim and a handful of pomegranate arils to the drink. Click to Shop […]
December 14, 2020

The 10 Most Popular Chicken Recipes of 2020

Our most popular chicken recipes this year show just how versatile and beloved it really is. We keep developing new cooking techniques and flavor profiles to […]
December 14, 2020

If You're Serious About Kitchen Organizing, You Need This Spice Rack

Before I got serious about organizing my kitchen, I’d engage in the same ritual every time I cooked or baked. Jar by jar, I’d pull out […]
December 14, 2020

Marinated Cauliflower Salad

Can’t stop, won’t stop with refrigerator salads! If you’re new here, refrigerator salads are salads that hold up really well in the refrigerator, so you can […]